Don’t Fall Into These Property Investment Traps!

Property investment is a very popular way for people to grow their money over time. However, some potential problems can arise when you invest your money in property. The good news is you can find out all about them and how to avoid them, and maximize your profits, below. 

Not having a clear idea of how you will make your money 

When it comes to property there are several options to consider from buying a flipping residential home, where money is made by buying at a low price, renovating while keeping costs down, and then selling for a higher price than originally bought at. 

Then there are the investors that prefer to rent out the properties they have, gaining a monthly income that can be offset against the mortgage, something that means when they do come to sell they will be able to access more of the profits. 

The residential sector is not the only other option either as there are plenty of commercial opportunities too including factories, warehouses, office buildings, and workshops. Not to mention the overseas vacation rental market which is quite different from the residential one as it involves short-term lets, but usually includes a much higher standard of living with easy access to facilities such as swimming pools, etc.  

Not getting local enough with your research 

You can study the global and national figures for property sales all you like, but the most important information by far will always be what you can collect on a local level. 

Indeed, you must have access to local property data such as which homes are most sought after in the area, as well as home and land values. The good news is you can get started now on this research by speaking to your local real estate agent. After all, it is their business to have a firm grasp on all the numbers and values in the location they are based in. 

Not having a full grasp on the costs involved 

Whether you plan to lease or flip a property, there are many costs associated with property investing in property that might not always be entirely obvious, to begin with. These include repair costs such as new roofs or windows, rebuilding walls, and paths. Then there are the maintenance costs that you will need to pay for tasks like keeping the garden safe and looking good, making sure the appliances all work, as well as the internal systems like electricity and heating. 

Of course, the property investor looking to lease to others will need to take an inventory of all these costs, as they will need to be accounted for in the price they charge per month. For flippers, these costs will need to be taken off the final sale price along with the price of the property, and any labor that has been paid for, before they can access any profits. 

Indeed, it would be a major mistake to take on a property as any form of investment, without investigating thoroughly the costs involved beforehand.